QuaterMaster - AccuScope Scope-Sighting Reference Tool

Gun Magazine - Finest in the Firearm Field

Article by John Connor

Leave your abacus at home and slide these into your pocket. The math-monsters at AccuScope already made all the calculations for sighting in scopes.

“Yo, Connor!” my cell-phone squeaked. “I’m sighting in my new ‘scope, OK?”

“Yeah, OK Slim, cool. ‘Bye now,” I said. I like to keep calls brief, ya know? But before I could punch the “Dump Caller” key he blurted, “Wait! I’ve been crankin’ this sucker all over the target! I’m 7" low and 3" left. How many clicks will get me to zero?” I asked Slim whether his adjustments were 1/2", 1/4" or maybe 1/8" and his shooting distance.

“The adjustments are just in clicks,” he said, “and I’m about 50, maybe 75 yards out. Is that important?” Sigh. Someday I’ll write a book called Ballistic Moronics.

As you all know, I ain’t no genius. But in a flash, I knew if his adjustments were 1/2", he would need 28 clicks elevation at 50 yards, or 19 clicks at 75 — and if his ‘scope had 1/8" adjustments, he would need 112 clicks at 50 or 75 at 75 yards. His windage adjustments took another full second.

No Abacus Needed

I just consulted my AccuScope chart. I’ve used several sighting-in references, and this is the coolest, handiest, fastest one I’ve found.

AccuScope is a 9"x4" weather-treated sandwich card with a slider in the middle. One version covers 1/4" and 1/2" adjustable scopes and a second version covers precision 1/8" glass. Simple, complete instructions lead you through measuring your offset from zero horizontally and vertically, sliding the center card to display those measurements, and then reading the number of clicks shown directly under your shooting distance, which is graduated from 25 to 200 yards.

Both versions of the AccuScope chart break your offset measurements into the appropriate fractions of an inch, and even include a handy ruler for field use on non-gridded targets – or for guys like Slim, who tend to be ruler-less as well as clueless. AccuScope saves time, ammo and “field frustration.” They’re $9.95 each and well worth it.

gunsmagazine.com

web site design by webForge media.